Chinese Contribution to CMIP5:An Overview of Five Chinese Models’Performances

+ Author Affiliations + Find other works by these authors
  • Funds:

    This work is jointly supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (41125017, 41330423), National Program on Key Basic Research Project (2010CB951904), and Public Science and Technology Research Funds Projects of Ocean (201105019-3).

  • doi: 10.1007/s13351-014-4001-y

PDF

  • An overview of Chinese contribution to Coupled Model Intercomparison Project-Phase 5 (CMIP5) is presented. The performances of five Chinese Climate/Earth System Models that participated in the CMIP5 project are assessed in the context of climate mean states, seasonal cycle, intraseasonal oscillation, interan- nual variability, interdecadal variability, global monsoon, Asian-Australian monsoon, 20th-century historical climate simulation, climate change projection, and climate sensitivity. Both the strengths and weaknesses of the models are evaluated. The models generally show reasonable performances in simulating sea surface tem- perature (SST) mean state, seasonal cycle, spatial patterns of Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) amplitude and tropical cyclone Genesis Potential Index (GPI), global monsoon precipitation pattern, El Nio-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), and Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) related SST anomalies. However, the perfor- mances of the models in simulating the time periods, amplitude, and phase locking of ENSO, PDO time periods, GPI magnitude, MJO propagation, magnitude of SST seasonal cycle, northwestern Pacific mon- soon and North American monsoon domains, as well as the skill of large-scale Asian monsoon precipitation need to be improved. The model performances in simulating the time evolution and spatial pattern of the 20th-century global warming and the future change under representative concentration pathways projection are compared to the multimodel ensemble of CMIP5 models. The model discrepancies in terms of climate sensitivity are also discussed.
  • 加载中
  • 加载中
通讯作者: 陈斌, bchen63@163.com
  • 1. 

    沈阳化工大学材料科学与工程学院 沈阳 110142

  1. 本站搜索
  2. 百度学术搜索
  3. 万方数据库搜索
  4. CNKI搜索

Chinese Contribution to CMIP5:An Overview of Five Chinese Models’Performances

  • 1. State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics,Institute of Atmospheric Physics,Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100029;
    Climate Change Research Center,Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100029;
    State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics,Institute of Atmospheric Physics,Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100029;
    University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100029;
    State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics,Institute of Atmospheric Physics,Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100029;
    University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100029;
    State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics,Institute of Atmospheric Physics,Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100029;
    State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics,Institute of Atmospheric Physics,Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100029;
    State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics,Institute of Atmospheric Physics,Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100029;
    State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics,Institute of Atmospheric Physics,Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100029;
    University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100029;
    State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics,Institute of Atmospheric Physics,Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100029;
    University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100029;
    State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics,Institute of Atmospheric Physics,Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100029;
    University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100029;
    Laboratory for Climate Studies,National Climate Center,China Meteorological Administration,Beijing 100081
Funds: This work is jointly supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (41125017, 41330423), National Program on Key Basic Research Project (2010CB951904), and Public Science and Technology Research Funds Projects of Ocean (201105019-3).

Abstract: An overview of Chinese contribution to Coupled Model Intercomparison Project-Phase 5 (CMIP5) is presented. The performances of five Chinese Climate/Earth System Models that participated in the CMIP5 project are assessed in the context of climate mean states, seasonal cycle, intraseasonal oscillation, interan- nual variability, interdecadal variability, global monsoon, Asian-Australian monsoon, 20th-century historical climate simulation, climate change projection, and climate sensitivity. Both the strengths and weaknesses of the models are evaluated. The models generally show reasonable performances in simulating sea surface tem- perature (SST) mean state, seasonal cycle, spatial patterns of Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) amplitude and tropical cyclone Genesis Potential Index (GPI), global monsoon precipitation pattern, El Nio-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), and Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) related SST anomalies. However, the perfor- mances of the models in simulating the time periods, amplitude, and phase locking of ENSO, PDO time periods, GPI magnitude, MJO propagation, magnitude of SST seasonal cycle, northwestern Pacific mon- soon and North American monsoon domains, as well as the skill of large-scale Asian monsoon precipitation need to be improved. The model performances in simulating the time evolution and spatial pattern of the 20th-century global warming and the future change under representative concentration pathways projection are compared to the multimodel ensemble of CMIP5 models. The model discrepancies in terms of climate sensitivity are also discussed.

Catalog

    /

    DownLoad:  Full-Size Img  PowerPoint
    Return
    Return