Characteristics of the Regional Meteorological Drought Events in Southwest China During 1960-2010

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  • Funds:

    Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (41175075) and Climate Change Special Fund of the ChinaMeteorological Administration (CCSF201333).

  • doi: 10.1007/s13351-014-3144-1

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  • An objective identification technique for regional extreme events (OITREE) and the daily composite- drought index (CI) at 101 stations in Southwest China (including Sichuan, Yunnan, Guizhou, and Chongqing) are used to detect regional meteorological drought events between 1960 and 2010. Values of the parameters of the OITREE method are determined. A total of 87 drought events are identified, including 9 extreme events. The 2009-2010 drought is the most serious in Southwest China during the past 50 years. The regional meteorological drought events during 1960-2010 generally last for 10-80 days, with the longest being 231 days. Droughts are more common from November to next April, and less common in the remaining months. Droughts occur more often and with greater intensity in Yunnan and southern Sichuan than in other parts of Southwest China. Strong (extreme and severe) regional meteorological drought events can be divided into five types. The southern type has occurred most frequently, and Yunnan is the area most frequently stricken by extreme and severe drought events. The regional meteorological drought events in Southwest China have increased in both frequency and intensity over the study period, and the main reason appears to be a significant decrease in precipitation over this region, but a simultaneous increase in temperature also contributes.
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    沈阳化工大学材料科学与工程学院 沈阳 110142

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Characteristics of the Regional Meteorological Drought Events in Southwest China During 1960-2010

  • 1. College of Atmospheric Science,Nanjing University of Information Science &Technology,Nanjing 210044;
    State Key Laboratory of Severe Weather,Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences,Beijing 100081;
    State Key Laboratory of Severe Weather,Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences,Beijing 100081;
    Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Climate Change,Nanjing 210008;
    Institute of Arid Meteorology,China Meteorological Administration,Lanzhou 730020;
    Beijing Climate Center,Beijing 100081;
    Yunnan Climate Center,Kunming 650034
Funds: Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (41175075) and Climate Change Special Fund of the ChinaMeteorological Administration (CCSF201333).

Abstract: An objective identification technique for regional extreme events (OITREE) and the daily composite- drought index (CI) at 101 stations in Southwest China (including Sichuan, Yunnan, Guizhou, and Chongqing) are used to detect regional meteorological drought events between 1960 and 2010. Values of the parameters of the OITREE method are determined. A total of 87 drought events are identified, including 9 extreme events. The 2009-2010 drought is the most serious in Southwest China during the past 50 years. The regional meteorological drought events during 1960-2010 generally last for 10-80 days, with the longest being 231 days. Droughts are more common from November to next April, and less common in the remaining months. Droughts occur more often and with greater intensity in Yunnan and southern Sichuan than in other parts of Southwest China. Strong (extreme and severe) regional meteorological drought events can be divided into five types. The southern type has occurred most frequently, and Yunnan is the area most frequently stricken by extreme and severe drought events. The regional meteorological drought events in Southwest China have increased in both frequency and intensity over the study period, and the main reason appears to be a significant decrease in precipitation over this region, but a simultaneous increase in temperature also contributes.

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